Halogen Oven Bulb Changing

I’ll have some more food-related features in the coming days but this evening, I’ve decided to share a walkthrough on how to replace the bulb inside a halogen oven, as there’s a good chance it may help someone else.

In all fairness, the manual for mine (Andrew James 12lt Premium) wasn’t too bad and in case you’re wondering; I believe I bought this back in March, around the time of my birthday and the original bulb has only just ‘blown’ this past weekend, meaning it’s lasted almost 7 months after fair usage (assuming it was new to start with).

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New Blue

Since repainting my living room in Dulux’s lemon tropics over the summer, I’ve woken up in bed most mornings with the thought of what to do about my ever-pale bedroom. Since I moved in, it’s been white and in the winter months, the room feels extra cold.

Last weekend – in fact, several weeks after buying the paint for this re-decoration (B&Q sale) – I decided to get my brush and roller out again.

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February’s Fall

Just when I thought it was safe to stow away my claw hammer; the gale-force winds returned and I found myself faced with another fence panel repair and post to replace. I guess I forgot to knock on wood. It’s ironic that the lighting bolt would strike the same spot again, mere weeks after assuring myself that my time as a fence panel-repairer was over.

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Makin’ Bacon Wave

Did you know that you can make a bacon sandwich in a microwave? Some might disregard the microwave as nothing more than a re-heater-upper but I’ve spent almost the last three-years getting by with one, in the absence of a reliable gas or fan oven. I should add that mine’s a ‘combi’ model, with a convection fan feature for oven cooking meals. As I prepare to say goodbye to mine in exchange for a halogen oven, I thought I’d share with you this method of making a bacon sandwich.

Mmmmm… Bacon!

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Time to Switch Off

Sometime last year, I wrote in complaint about the deemed-inefficiency of the battery that powers my Samsung Galaxy SII smart phone. This phone is just over a year old in my possession and I’ve frequently found myself having to recharge the battery on a daily (nightly) basis. I tried various tips at the time of writing that post – some of which, have helped to prolong the duration of the battery’s charge, albeit minutely. But I now believe I’ve found a more definitive solution.

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Time to switch off.

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Book Box Beginnings

Whenever I’m working on something, I always seem to have two other projects running at the same time. You might already be aware that I’m making a folding meditation stool and you’ve probably seen in recent weeks that I’m slowly making progress on a pair of chess boards. But what you won’t have seen much of is this third project, which I’ve only really started this week.

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Making Hoses Fit

If you’ve ever tried to connect a vacuum to your portable power tools, you’re likely to have come across one (if not several) where the supplied nozzle at the end of the hose doesn’t even come close to fitting snugly in to the tool’s outlet. Some people will resort to using masking tape or scraps of PVC pipe; worse still (and I’ve been guilty of this many times) is where people decide to neglect the use of dust extraction and then proceed to cut, plane, rout or sand away with fine particles filling their workshops!

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On Friday, while I was waiting for the glue to dry on a pair of chess boards (more on the perils of gluing end-grain to end-grain another time), I decided to have a go at making an attachment that would connect my vacuum to my random orbital sander. As you can see above; it works and I got the idea initially from (I think) Chris Pine over on Keek (@cpine).

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An additional tip for drilling small squares safely!

You basically take two small squares of plywood, drilling one hole in each. In one block, you have a hole sized to take the nozzle from the vacuum; the other is drilled to fit over your tool’s outlet or port. Then, these two blocks are carefully glued together and I rounded the corners off to make it aesthetically pleasing.

It’s a custom solution that doesn’t cost a lot but might ensure you never run out of masking tape. You may still need to manufacture one ‘fitting’ for each of your tools but, if it means you’re more likely to use dust extraction then it’s worth it.

Thanks for reading and I hope you’ve found this tip useful.